The First World War and The British Empire pt2 | The History Faculty

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Video podcast. ‘How far do you agree that the First World War marked a decisive change in Britain’s control over its empire in the years 1870-1980?’. At the end of the First World War the British Empire had reached its territorial peak. In addition to the territories she already had, Britain added lands from Africa and the Middle East. However, it is often asserted that the First World War marked the major turning point in the degree of control the British had over their empire. Three main areas be examined: how the First World War affected British control over India, over Africa, and over the white Dominions – Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and South Africa. Contributing factors arising from indirect consequences of the First World War will also be examined.

Original URL: http://www.thehistoryfaculty.org/a-levels/item/254-the-first-world-war-and-the-british-empire-pt2

Resource Type : video

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Cite : The First World War and The British Empire pt2 | The History Faculty (http://www.thehistoryfaculty.org/a-levels/item/254-the-first-world-war-and-the-british-empire-pt2) by Christopher Prior licensed as CC-BY-NC-SA (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/)

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About Kate Lindsay

Kate Lindsay, University of Oxford is the Director of World War One Centenary: Continuations and Beginnings. She is also the Manager for Education Enhancement at Academic IT where she also led the First World War Poetry Digital Archive and public engagement initiative Great War Archive. She has eight years experience of in-depth work on World War I digital archives and educational curricula. Kate has a degree in English Literature from the University of Leeds, combined with an MSc in Information Systems from the University for Sheffield, and an MSc in Educational Research from the University of Oxford. She is particularly interested in womens' experience of War and the representation of the First World War in popular culture.
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