Nick Milne

English Department, University of Ottawa
Nick Milne is an adjunct professor in the Department of English at the University of Ottawa. His research focuses on the intersection of literary scholarship and historiography in the study of the First World War, with a particular emphasis on how this has impacted the study of the war's British propaganda writing. He has had work about the war appear recently at Slate and on BBC Radio 3 and 4. Further updates on these and related subjects may be found at his blog, Wellington House, or through his twitter feed.

Some Sounds of the War

The First World War’s cultural impact can be felt quite heavily in song as well as in literature and art. A distinction should first be cast between two different kinds of songs: those that were popular on the home front … Continue reading

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Pen and Sword Pt. IV: Yeats Refuses to Declare

[N.B. This is the fourth in a series of posts about the history of British propaganda efforts during the First World War — the inaugural post can be read here.  The main focus of the series will be on the … Continue reading

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Pen and Sword Pt. III: 5 Questions

[N.B. This is the third in a series of posts about the history of British propaganda efforts during the First World War — the inaugural post can be read here.  The main focus of the series will be on the … Continue reading

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Pen and Sword Pt. II: Advertising King Albert’s Book

[N.B. This is the second in an intended series of posts about the history of British propaganda efforts during the First World War — the inaugural post can be read here.  The main focus of the series will be on … Continue reading

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Pen and Sword Pt. I: The Authors’ Declaration

[N.B. This is the first in an intended series of posts about the history of British propaganda efforts during the First World War.  The main focus of the series will be on the literary side of things, but possibly with … Continue reading

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The Worst(?) Poem of the First World War

It would be fair to say, in a spirit of understatement, that the First World War served as the occasion for a certain amount of poetry. Catherine W. Reilly, in her groundbreaking English Poetry of the First World War: A … Continue reading

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The ‘Rape of Belgium’ Revisited

The above image is an extract from a proclamation by the German General Otto von Emmich, distributed widely in Belgium in the autumn of 1914 as the German army crossed the tiny nation’s borders and began its slow march south.  … Continue reading

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Chasing Lettow-Vorbeck — A Forgotten Catastrophe?

For those of you who have never read the articles at Cracked.com, I can’t say I would heartily recommend the experience.  While they’re of some value, sometimes, in bringing to popular attention subjects and people that might otherwise languish in … Continue reading

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Words for Battle

The first episode of BBC Radio 4’s new documentary series, 1914-1918: The Cultural Front, is now available for listening. “Words for Battle” examines the response of the British literary and cultural establishment to the war’s commencement in August of 1914, … Continue reading

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