Arras – German Regimental Commanders captured by the Canadians | National Library of Scotland

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German officers after capture by a Canadian regiment. In the photograph four German officers, who are captives of a Canadian regiment, stand chatting and smoking. The relaxed air of the men in the picture compared to other photographs from the Haig collection which show lines of lower-ranked prisoners marching under heavy guard, suggests that officers were often treated preferentially, even as prisoners of war. Canada had regiments fighting in Europe from 1915. The Canadian Expeditionary Force was mobilised late in 1914 and Canadian troops went on to fight bravely in some of the most notorious campaigns of the war, including the Somme, Arras, Passchendaele and the final Allied offensives of 1918.

Original reads: ‘German Regiment Commanders captured by the Canadians.’

The Battle of Arras 9th April to 16th May 1917

Original URL: http://digital.nls.uk/first-world-war-official-photographs/pageturner.cfm?id=74549202

Resource Type : image

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Cite : Arras - German Regimental Commanders captured by the Canadians | National Library of Scotland (http://digital.nls.uk/first-world-war-official-photographs/pageturner.cfm?id=74549202) by National Library Scotland licensed as CC-BY-NC-SA (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/scotland/)

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About Kate Lindsay

Kate Lindsay, University of Oxford is the Director of World War One Centenary: Continuations and Beginnings. She is also the Manager for Education Enhancement at Academic IT where she also led the First World War Poetry Digital Archive and public engagement initiative Great War Archive. She has eight years experience of in-depth work on World War I digital archives and educational curricula. Kate has a degree in English Literature from the University of Leeds, combined with an MSc in Information Systems from the University for Sheffield, and an MSc in Educational Research from the University of Oxford. She is particularly interested in womens' experience of War and the representation of the First World War in popular culture.
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