Boarding buses to go back for a rest after the hard fighting at Monchy | National Library of Scotland

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Requisitioned London General Omnibus Company buses, boarded up and re-painted, used to transport tired troops out of the line after heavy fighting at Monchy le Preux. Around 900 were used on the Western Front in the Great War, and each could carry 24 fully equipped infantrymen. There were never enough to go around, however, and in ordinary circumstances troops had to march out of the line to their rest.

Although undated, uniform details suggest photograph taken in 1917, thus during the Arras Offensive (another Battle of the Scarpe was fought in 1918).

Original reads: ‘Boarding buses to go back for a rest after the hard fighting at Monchy.’

Original URL: http://digital.nls.uk/first-world-war-official-photographs/pageturner.cfm?id=74549538

Resource Type : image

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Cite : Boarding buses to go back for a rest after the hard fighting at Monchy | National Library of Scotland (http://digital.nls.uk/first-world-war-official-photographs/pageturner.cfm?id=74549538) by licensed as CC-BY-NC-SA (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/scotland/)

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About Richard Marshall

Richard Marshall is studying for a doctorate in the literature of ancient Rome at Wadham College, Oxford, and is a tutor for Ancient History at St Benet’s Hall. In addition to Classics, he has a long-standing interest in the tactics and material culture of the British Army, especially of the period spanned by the Cardwell Reforms and First World War. He has a large collection of original uniform and equipment items used for teaching and research purposes, and is currently exploring the evolution of British military clothing and accoutrements in response to changes in fashion and warfare for eventual publication. He previously worked as a cataloguer for the Oxford University Great War Archive.
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