Fitting Temporary ‘Peg Legs’ | Otis Historical Archives National Museum of Health and Medicine

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Caption: ‘The Peg Leg Department of the Surgical Appliances Association in London, allied with the American Red Cross, where all splints and similar appliances for American soldiers on this side of the water are made. The workers are all women, who have become highly skilled in their unique war work. They supply both the American and British armies with all kinds of splints and surgical appliances, many of which have been invented or improved by the women themselves. The peg-legs are a specialty of the Association, being fitted to men for use while their stumps are healing and until a regular artificial limb can be fitted. After many efforts the Association has got the manufacture of peg-legs down to such a fine point that the average cost is only about $2.25.’

Uniform details suggest date of 1918. Soldier of the Gloucestershire Regiments standing; Warrant Officer class II sitting left wearing blue hospital uniform.

Original URL: http://www.flickr.com/photos/medicalmuseum/3298874900/in/set-72157614294614418/

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About Richard Marshall

Richard Marshall is studying for a doctorate in the literature of ancient Rome at Wadham College, Oxford, and is a tutor for Ancient History at St Benet’s Hall. In addition to Classics, he has a long-standing interest in the tactics and material culture of the British Army, especially of the period spanned by the Cardwell Reforms and First World War. He has a large collection of original uniform and equipment items used for teaching and research purposes, and is currently exploring the evolution of British military clothing and accoutrements in response to changes in fashion and warfare for eventual publication. He previously worked as a cataloguer for the Oxford University Great War Archive.
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