Flying for France: With the American Escadrille at Verdun by James R. McConnell | Project Gutenberg

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Posthumously published account of service in the Lafayette Escadrille (a French fighter squadron composed mainly of American volunteer pilots) by James Rogers McConnell, a student who initially volunteered to serve in the American Ambulance Corps in France in January 1915, and later transferred to the French Air Service. Killed in aerial combat on 19th March 1917.

CONTENTS
Introduction
By F. C. P.
CHAPTER
I. Verdun
II. From Verdun to the Somme
III. Personal Letters from Sergeant McConnell
IV. How France Trains Pilot Aviators
V. Against Odds

New York: Doubleday, Page & Company, 1917.

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About Richard Marshall

Richard Marshall is studying for a doctorate in the literature of ancient Rome at Wadham College, Oxford, and is a tutor for Ancient History at St Benet’s Hall. In addition to Classics, he has a long-standing interest in the tactics and material culture of the British Army, especially of the period spanned by the Cardwell Reforms and First World War. He has a large collection of original uniform and equipment items used for teaching and research purposes, and is currently exploring the evolution of British military clothing and accoutrements in response to changes in fashion and warfare for eventual publication. He previously worked as a cataloguer for the Oxford University Great War Archive.
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