Government Ownership of Railroads, and War Taxation by Otto Hermann Kahn | Project Gutenberg

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Pamphlet edition of ‘An Address before the National Industrial Conference Board, New York, October 10, 1918’, by American banker Otto Hermann Kahn, arguing against State control of the Railways and special taxation, measures supposedly design to limit profiteering from the conflict and improve industrial output.

Kahn, an American citizen of German family, was educated in Mannheim and in the 1880s was required to report for obligatory military service. This he undertook in one of the Kaiser’s Hussars Regiments.

Table of Contents
Government Ownership of Railroads: p. 3
Punitive Paternalism in Taxation: p. 27

[New York, 1918]

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About Richard Marshall

Richard Marshall is studying for a doctorate in the literature of ancient Rome at Wadham College, Oxford, and is a tutor for Ancient History at St Benet’s Hall. In addition to Classics, he has a long-standing interest in the tactics and material culture of the British Army, especially of the period spanned by the Cardwell Reforms and First World War. He has a large collection of original uniform and equipment items used for teaching and research purposes, and is currently exploring the evolution of British military clothing and accoutrements in response to changes in fashion and warfare for eventual publication. He previously worked as a cataloguer for the Oxford University Great War Archive.
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