History of the American Negro in the Great World War by William Allison Sweeney | Project Gutenberg

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‘History of the American Negro in the Great World War: His Splendid Record in the Battle Zones of Europe. Including a Resume of his Past Services to his Country in the Wars of the Revolution, of 1812, The War of the Rebellion, The Indian Wars on the Frontier, The Spanish-American War, and the Late Imbroglio with Mexico’, by W. Allison Sweeney, African-American journalist and contributing editor of the Chicago Defender.

Including a summary of the service of the 370th Infantry Regiment, known as the “Old Eighth” (originally raised as the 8th Illinois National Guard), part of the 93rd Division, a unit composed exclusively of African-American troops.

African American soldiers faced institutional prejudice from all levels of the United States Army, and despite volunteering in large numbers, were forced to serve in segregated units, generally as labourers. Two combat formations were, however, raised for political reasons: the 92nd and 93rd Divisions. The 93rd Division was placed at the disposal of the French with some relief by General Pershing, their employment of colonial troops from Africa giving them the experience supposedly necessary for employing ‘colored’ soldiers. The 92nd Division, on the other hand, remained under American control and was subject to a sustained campaign of slander from its own army commander, and removed from offensive operations. The service of the 93rd Division with the French, however, ensured that this unit and its men would be treated as equals in the line of battle.

CONTENTS
I. SPIRITUAL EMANCIPATION OF NATIONS.
II. HANDWRITING ON THE WALL.
III. MILITARISM AND AUTOCRACY DOOMED.
IV. AWAKENING OF AMERICA.
V. HUNS SWEEPING WESTWARD.
VI. THE HOUR AND THE MAN.
VII. NEGROES RESPOND TO THE CALL.
VIII. RECRUDESCENCE OF SOUTH’S INTOLERANCE.
IX. PREVIOUS WARS IN WHICH NEGRO FIGURED.
X. FROM LEXINGTON TO CARRIZAL.
XI. HOUR OF HIS NATION’S PERIL.
XII. NEGRO SLACKERS AND PACIFISTS UNKNOWN.
XIII. ROSTER OF NEGRO OFFICERS.
XIV. ACROSS DIVIDING SEAS.
XV. OVER THERE.
XVI. THROUGH HELL AND SUFFERING.
XVII. NARRATIVE OF AN OFFICER.
XVIII. BLOOD OF BLACK AND WHITE IN ONE RIVULET.
XIX. COMRADES ON THE MARCH—BROTHERS IN THE SLEEP OF DEATH.
XX. MID SHOT AND SHELL.
XXI. THE LONG, LONG TRAIL.
XXII. GLORY THAT WONT COME OFF.
XXIII. NOR STORIED URN, NOR MOUNTING SHAFT.
XXIV. THOSE WHO NEVER WILL RETURN.
XXV. QUIET HEROES OF THE BRAWNY ARM.
XXVI. UNSELFISH WORKERS IN THE VINEYARD.
XXVII. NEGRO IN ARMY PERSONNEL.
XXVIII. THE KNOCKOUT BLOW.
XXIX. HOMECOMING HEROES.
XXX. RECONSTRUCTION AND THE NEGRO.
XXXI. THE OTHER FELLOW’S BURDEN.
XXXII. AN INTERPOLATION.
XXXIII. THE NEW NEGRO AND THE NEW AMERICA.

[Chicago: Cuneo-Henneberry co., 1919]

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About Richard Marshall

Richard Marshall is studying for a doctorate in the literature of ancient Rome at Wadham College, Oxford, and is a tutor for Ancient History at St Benet’s Hall. In addition to Classics, he has a long-standing interest in the tactics and material culture of the British Army, especially of the period spanned by the Cardwell Reforms and First World War. He has a large collection of original uniform and equipment items used for teaching and research purposes, and is currently exploring the evolution of British military clothing and accoutrements in response to changes in fashion and warfare for eventual publication. He previously worked as a cataloguer for the Oxford University Great War Archive.
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