In the Bakery | National Library of Scotland

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Two soldiers moving flour bags. Two soldiers are straining under the weight of large sacks of flour, which they are carrying on their backs. Their uniforms have become completely white due to the work they are involved in. Cleaning and maintaining uniforms in the deprived conditions at the Front must have been a logistical nightmare for soldiers like these two. The flour is then being loaded on to a conveyor belt which disappears from view. This ‘everyday’ scene may not have had much propaganda value but it does leave a rich and detailed source of evidence for the more mundane aspects of life at the Front.

Original reads: ‘In the Bakery – putting sacks of flour on the elevator.’

 

Original URL: http://digital.nls.uk/first-world-war-official-photographs/pageturner.cfm?id=74548592

Resource Type : image

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Cite : In the Bakery | National Library of Scotland (http://digital.nls.uk/first-world-war-official-photographs/pageturner.cfm?id=74548592) by National Library Scotland licensed as CC-BY-NC-SA (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/scotland/)

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About Kate Lindsay

Kate Lindsay, University of Oxford is the Director of World War One Centenary: Continuations and Beginnings. She is also the Manager for Education Enhancement at Academic IT where she also led the First World War Poetry Digital Archive and public engagement initiative Great War Archive. She has eight years experience of in-depth work on World War I digital archives and educational curricula. Kate has a degree in English Literature from the University of Leeds, combined with an MSc in Information Systems from the University for Sheffield, and an MSc in Educational Research from the University of Oxford. She is particularly interested in womens' experience of War and the representation of the First World War in popular culture.
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