Scene in a ward of SA [South African] hospital | National Library of Scotland

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The interior of a makeshift hospital ward. There is a row of beds running down the middle of the room, with more lining the walls. Two fully dressed men are reclining on beds, one is smoking a pipe and the other is reading. There is only one man actually in bed – he is resting his chin on his hand and looking toward the camera. Three nurses stand in the aisles, posing for the camera. The ward itself has been set up in a very grand room, with chandeliers hanging from the ceilings and decorative wall lights positioned round the room.

The No. 1 South African General Hospital opened in July 1916 in a chateau on the outskirts of Abbeville. Base Hospitals such as this provided facilities for longer-term treatment and convalescence; many had to stay open late into 1919 to care for the sick and wounded.

Original reads: ‘OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE – SCENE IN A WARD OF SA HOSPITAL.’

Original URL: http://digital.nls.uk/first-world-war-official-photographs/pageturner.cfm?id=74546908

Resource Type : image

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Cite : Scene in a ward of SA [South African] hospital | National Library of Scotland (http://digital.nls.uk/first-world-war-official-photographs/pageturner.cfm?id=74546908) by E. Brooks licensed as CC-BY-NC-SA (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/scotland/)

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About Richard Marshall

Richard Marshall is studying for a doctorate in the literature of ancient Rome at Wadham College, Oxford, and is a tutor for Ancient History at St Benet’s Hall. In addition to Classics, he has a long-standing interest in the tactics and material culture of the British Army, especially of the period spanned by the Cardwell Reforms and First World War. He has a large collection of original uniform and equipment items used for teaching and research purposes, and is currently exploring the evolution of British military clothing and accoutrements in response to changes in fashion and warfare for eventual publication. He previously worked as a cataloguer for the Oxford University Great War Archive.
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