The Audacious War by Clarence W. Barron | Project Gutenberg

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‘[T]he immediate causes of this war … are connected with commercial treaties, protective tariffs, and financial progress … German “Kultur” means German progress, commercially and financially. German progress is by tariffs and commercial treaties. Her armies, her arms, and her armaments, are to support this “Kultur” and this progress.’

Survey of economic factors leading to the war by American financial journalist Clarence Barron, president of Dow Jones & Co from 1903. Concludes with call for the establishment of an ‘International Tribunal’ following the conflict that can maintain the peace of Europe.

Contents:
I. THE WORLD’S GREATEST CONTEST
II. TARIFFS AND COMMERCE THE WAR CAUSES
III. THE POLITICAL CAUSES OF THE WAR
IV. PEACE PROPOSALS
V. FRANCE AND THE FRENCH
VI. THE POSITION OF FRANCE
VII. FRENCH FINANCE
VIII. THE BELGIAN SACRIFICE
IX. RUSSIA AND THE RUSSIANS
X. THE ENGLISH POSITION
XI. ENGLISH WAR FORCES
XII. ENGLISH WAR FINANCE
XIII. GERMAN RESOURCES
XIV. IS IT THE PEOPLE’S WAR?
XV. THE GERMAN POSITION
XVI. THE LESSONS FOR AMERICA
XVII. WHAT PEACE SHOULD MEAN

Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1915

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Licence Project Gutenberg License (author d. 1928)

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About Richard Marshall

Richard Marshall is studying for a doctorate in the literature of ancient Rome at Wadham College, Oxford, and is a tutor for Ancient History at St Benet’s Hall. In addition to Classics, he has a long-standing interest in the tactics and material culture of the British Army, especially of the period spanned by the Cardwell Reforms and First World War. He has a large collection of original uniform and equipment items used for teaching and research purposes, and is currently exploring the evolution of British military clothing and accoutrements in response to changes in fashion and warfare for eventual publication. He previously worked as a cataloguer for the Oxford University Great War Archive.
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