The Entente Powers and The First World War pt2 | The History Faculty

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Podcast concerning the Entente’s role and the development of its strategy and actions during the First World War. The war began in August 1914 with a loose partnership initially between three powers, Great Britain, France, and Russia, and later Italy, which joined the war in 1915. The first and most important determinant factor in what the Great Powers did was the question of what they were fighting for. Each had different war aims, but in the treaty of London, signed in September 1914, the members of the Entente agreed not to make a separate peace. The three powers thus bound themselves to fight for each others’ war aims, and this by itself ensured that the war would be long, hard, and bloody.

Original URL: http://www.thehistoryfaculty.org/a-levels/item/220-the-central-powers-and-the-first-world-war-pt2

Resource Type : video

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Cite : The Entente Powers and The First World War pt2 | The History Faculty (http://www.thehistoryfaculty.org/a-levels/item/220-the-central-powers-and-the-first-world-war-pt2) by John Gooch licensed as CC-BY-NC-SA (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/)

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About Kate Lindsay

Kate Lindsay, University of Oxford is the Director of World War One Centenary: Continuations and Beginnings. She is also the Manager for Education Enhancement at Academic IT where she also led the First World War Poetry Digital Archive and public engagement initiative Great War Archive. She has eight years experience of in-depth work on World War I digital archives and educational curricula. Kate has a degree in English Literature from the University of Leeds, combined with an MSc in Information Systems from the University for Sheffield, and an MSc in Educational Research from the University of Oxford. She is particularly interested in womens’ experience of War and the representation of the First World War in popular culture.

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