The Evidence in the Case by James M. Beck | Project Gutenberg

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‘A Discussion of the Moral Responsibility for the War of 1914, as Disclosed by the Diplomatic Records of England, Germany, Russia, France, Austria, Italy and Belgium’, presented as a trial before an imagined ‘Supreme Court of Civilization’. By James M. Beck, American lawyer and politician with strong anti-German sympathies.

CONTENTS
Introduction
Foreword
The Witnesses
I: The Supreme Court of Civilization
II: The Record in the Case
III: The Suppressed Evidence
IV: Germany’s Responsibility for the Austrian Ultimatum
V: The Austrian Ultimatum to Servia
VI: The Peace Parleys
VII: The Attitude of France
VIII: The Intervention of the Kaiser
IX: The Case of Belgium
X: The Judgment of the World
Epilogue

New York: Grosset & Dunlap Publishers, 1915 [Revised ed. with add. material].

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Licence Project Gutenberg License (author d. 1936)

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About Richard Marshall

Richard Marshall is studying for a doctorate in the literature of ancient Rome at Wadham College, Oxford, and is a tutor for Ancient History at St Benet’s Hall. In addition to Classics, he has a long-standing interest in the tactics and material culture of the British Army, especially of the period spanned by the Cardwell Reforms and First World War. He has a large collection of original uniform and equipment items used for teaching and research purposes, and is currently exploring the evolution of British military clothing and accoutrements in response to changes in fashion and warfare for eventual publication. He previously worked as a cataloguer for the Oxford University Great War Archive.
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