The Great War, Grief, and Memory | Lecture 16 | France Since 1871 | Open Yale Courses

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Guest lecture delivered by Bruno Cabanes as part of the Yale College course ‘France since 1871’.  The human cost of World War I cannot be understood only in terms of demographics. To better understand the consequences of the war upon both soldiers and civilians it is necessary to consider mourning in its private, as well as its public dimensions. Indeed, for many French people who lived through the war, public spectacles of bereavement, such as the Unknown Soldier, were also conceived of as intensely private affairs. Both types of mourning are associated with a wide variety of rituals and procedures.

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Original URL: http://oyc.yale.edu/history/hist-276/lecture-16

Resource Type : video

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Cite : The Great War, Grief, and Memory | Lecture 16 | France Since 1871 | Open Yale Courses (http://oyc.yale.edu/history/hist-276/lecture-16) by Bruno Cabanes licensed as CC-BY-NC-SA (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/)

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About Kate Lindsay

Kate Lindsay, University of Oxford is the Director of World War One Centenary: Continuations and Beginnings. She is also the Manager for Education Enhancement at Academic IT where she also led the First World War Poetry Digital Archive and public engagement initiative Great War Archive. She has eight years experience of in-depth work on World War I digital archives and educational curricula. Kate has a degree in English Literature from the University of Leeds, combined with an MSc in Information Systems from the University for Sheffield, and an MSc in Educational Research from the University of Oxford. She is particularly interested in womens’ experience of War and the representation of the First World War in popular culture.

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