The Inside Story of the Peace Conference by Emile Joseph Dillon | Project Gutenberg

Access this resource

‘… [T]his book does not claim to be a history… of the Peace Conference … It is only a sketch … of the problems which the war created … of the simplistic ways in which they were conceived by the distinguished politicians who volunteered to solve them; of the delegates’ natural limitations and electioneering commitments and of the secret influences by which they were swayed; of the peoples’ needs and expectations; of the unwonted procedure adopted by the Conference and of the fateful consequences of its decisions to the world’. By the Irish journalist Emile Joseph Dillon, Russian correspondent for the Daily Telegraph, 1887-1914.

A sustained criticism of the Peace Conference, identifying major flaws in its handling of Bolshevism and the incoherence of the plan for a League of Nations.

CONTENTS
I: THE CITY OF THE CONFERENCE
II: SIGNS OF THE TIMES
III: THE DELEGATES
IV: CENSORSHIP AND SECRECY
V: AIMS AND METHODS
VI: THE LESSER STATES
VII: POLAND’S OUTLOOK IN THE FUTURE
VIII: ITALY
IX: JAPAN
X: ATTITUDE TOWARD RUSSIA
XI: BOLSHEVISM
XII: HOW BOLSHEVISM WAS FOSTERED
XIII: SIDELIGHTS ON THE TREATY
XIV: THE TREATY WITH GERMANY
XV: THE TREATY WITH BULGARIA
XVI: THE COVENANT AND MINORITIES

New York and London: Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1920

This book is available in the following formats: HTML, EPUB, Kindle, Plucker, QiOO Mobile, Plain Text UTF-8.

Original URL: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/14477

Resource Type : ebook

19 visits / 0 Like(s) (Like this resource)

Licence Project Gutenberg License (author d. 1933)

Cite : The Inside Story of the Peace Conference by Emile Joseph Dillon | Project Gutenberg (http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/14477) by E. J. Dillon licensed as Project Gutenberg License (author d. 1933) (http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Gutenberg:The_Project_Gutenberg_License#The_Full_Project_Gutenberg_License_in_Legalese_.28normative.29)

Reuse : Web link

About Richard Marshall

Richard Marshall is studying for a doctorate in the literature of ancient Rome at Wadham College, Oxford, and is a tutor for Ancient History at St Benet’s Hall. In addition to Classics, he has a long-standing interest in the tactics and material culture of the British Army, especially of the period spanned by the Cardwell Reforms and First World War. He has a large collection of original uniform and equipment items used for teaching and research purposes, and is currently exploring the evolution of British military clothing and accoutrements in response to changes in fashion and warfare for eventual publication. He previously worked as a cataloguer for the Oxford University Great War Archive.
This entry was posted in Aftermath, Consent, Dissent and Revolution. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply