To what extent was WW1 responsible for longer term Liberal decline? pt1 | The History Faculty

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Video podcast. In the years before the Firstt World War, the liberal party dominated the political landscape. Their landslide victory in 1906 heralded one of the most important reforming governments of the century. But ten years later, Asquith’s Liberal government was replaced by a Conservative-dominated coalition with Lloyd George as its premier, and by 1922 Lloyd George himself had been rather unceremoniously dumped by the Conservatives. The Liberals would never again hold office. Clearly the period around the First World War marked a huge reversal of fortunes for the Liberal party, but to what extent was this a product of the war itself?

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About Kate Lindsay

Kate Lindsay, University of Oxford is the Director of World War One Centenary: Continuations and Beginnings. She is also the Manager for Education Enhancement at Academic IT where she also led the First World War Poetry Digital Archive and public engagement initiative Great War Archive. She has eight years experience of in-depth work on World War I digital archives and educational curricula. Kate has a degree in English Literature from the University of Leeds, combined with an MSc in Information Systems from the University for Sheffield, and an MSc in Educational Research from the University of Oxford. She is particularly interested in womens’ experience of War and the representation of the First World War in popular culture.

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