U.S. Army Medical Department recruiting poster |Posters: World War I Posters | Library of Congress

Access this resource

Title: Know him by this sign – the medical caduceus The wounds of war are not all healed / / Bartow Matteson, Lieut. U.S.A.

Creator(s): Matteson, Bartow van Voorhis, b. 1894, artist

Date Created/Published: [1919]
Medium: 1 photomechanical print (poster) : halftone,

color.
Summary: U.S. Army Medical Department recruiting poster showing bust portrait of man wearing hat, and a pin with the caduceus on it.

Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-7576 (color film copy transparency)

Call Number: POS – US .M383, no. 1 (C size) [P&P]
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
Notes:

Poster caption continues: Enlist for one or three years and help finish the job ; Medical Department, United States Army ; Opportunities for qualified men to learn: x-ray work, practical pharmacy, veterinary practice, operating room work, dentistry, laboratory work, [and] hospital service.

Original URL: http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/wwipos/item/00651835/

Resource Type : image

19 visits / 0 Like(s) (Like this resource)

Licence Public Domain

Cite : U.S. Army Medical Department recruiting poster |Posters: World War I Posters | Library of Congress (http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/wwipos/item/00651835/) by Library of Congress licensed as Public Domain (http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/243_wwipos.html)

Reuse : Web link

About Kate Lindsay

Kate Lindsay, University of Oxford is the Director of World War One Centenary: Continuations and Beginnings. She is also the Manager for Education Enhancement at Academic IT where she also led the First World War Poetry Digital Archive and public engagement initiative Great War Archive. She has eight years experience of in-depth work on World War I digital archives and educational curricula. Kate has a degree in English Literature from the University of Leeds, combined with an MSc in Information Systems from the University for Sheffield, and an MSc in Educational Research from the University of Oxford. She is particularly interested in womens' experience of War and the representation of the First World War in popular culture.
This entry was posted in Aftermath, Body and Mind. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply