War Neuroses: Netley Hospital, 1917 | Wellcome Collection

Access this resource

Shows the symptomatology of “shell shock” in 18 British “other rankers” and its treatment by two leading R.A.M.C. neurologists in two British military hospitals towards the end of the First World War. Captions tell us the men’s names, rank, medical condition, details of their symptoms and how long it took to complete the cure, which in one case was in two and a half hours. Clinical features shown include a variety of ataxic and “hysterical” gaits; hysterical paralyses, contractures and anaesthesias; facial ties and spasms; loss of knee and ankle-jerk reflexes; paraplegia; “war hyperthyrodism”; amnesia; word-blindness and word-deafness. Although there are no precise details of the kind of treatment given, apart from the description ‘cured and re-educated’ we do see a little physiotherapy and hypnotic suggestion in treatment, and of ‘cured’ men undertaking farm-work, drill and a mock battles entitled ‘Re-enacting the Battle of Seale Hayne / Convalescent war neurosis patients’.

Available in 5 segments.

Original URL: http://catalogue.wellcome.ac.uk/record=b1667864~S8

Resource Type : video

52 visits / 0 Like(s) (Like this resource)

Licence CC-BY-NC-SA

Cite : War Neuroses: Netley Hospital, 1917 | Wellcome Collection (http://catalogue.wellcome.ac.uk/record=b1667864~S8) by Welcome Library licensed as CC-BY-NC-SA (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/)

Reuse : Web link

About Kate Lindsay

Kate Lindsay, University of Oxford is the Director of World War One Centenary: Continuations and Beginnings. She is also the Manager for Education Enhancement at Academic IT where she also led the First World War Poetry Digital Archive and public engagement initiative Great War Archive. She has eight years experience of in-depth work on World War I digital archives and educational curricula. Kate has a degree in English Literature from the University of Leeds, combined with an MSc in Information Systems from the University for Sheffield, and an MSc in Educational Research from the University of Oxford. She is particularly interested in womens' experience of War and the representation of the First World War in popular culture.
This entry was posted in Body and Mind. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply